MCG University

Incognito Window

In this course of MCG University, we walk through on Incognito Window and what it is. Our video this week demonstrates how to launch an Incognito Window in various web browsers. We show you how you can get this done through Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and Mozilla Firefox.

Private browsing is a privacy feature in some web browsers. When operating in such a mode, the browser creates a temporary session that is isolated from the browser’s main session and user data. An Incognito Window runs in a separate window from your from your normal browsers. When your are browsing using an incognito window:

  • It won’t save your browsing history, cookies and site data, or information entered in forms, however. Please be advised that Cookies and site data are remembered while you’re browsing, but deleted when you exit Incognito mode.
  • Files you download and bookmarks you create will be kept.
  • Your activity isn’t hidden from websites you visit, your employer or school, or your internet service provider.

A web service, website, search engine, or provider may be able to see:

  • Your IP address
  • Your activity when you use a web service
  • Your identity if you sign in to a web service. Websites still need to be able to authenticate you in order to provide you access.

Incognito Window on Google Chrome

  • Open Google Chrome
  • Click the three dot icon in the upper-right corner
  • Click on “New Incognito Window” from the drop-down menu
  • A window will open
  • You can also open an Incognito Window with the keyboard shortcut CTRL+Shift+n

Incognito Window on Microsoft Edge

  • Open Microsoft Edge
  • Click the three dot icon in the upper-right corner
  • Click on “New InPrivate Window” from the drop-down menu
  • A window will open

Incognito Window on Mozilla Firefox

  • Open Mozilla Firefox
  • Click the three dot icon in the upper-right corner
  • Click on “New Private Window” from the drop-down menu
  • A window will open